Lens of the Month


Tamron's SP 70-200mm Di VC G2 Lens (A025)



Article by Jenn Gidman
Images by Patrick Nagle

Tamron's 70-200 lens has long been Pat Nagle's favorite lens, proving to be an invaluable fast zoom for his varied photographic needs, including for the landscapes and weddings he often shoots. "My passion was originally action sports—snowboarding, surfing, and the like," he says. "I branched out from there, and when Tamron came out with the new SP 70-200mm F/2.8 VC G2 version, it simply elevated my photos to the next level. It's a must-have for me, especially as a wedding photographer, as it allows me to capture every candid moment without intruding on my subjects."

© Patrick Nagle

The enhanced Vibration Compensation (VC) feature on the 70-200 G2—now with three modes, including one exclusively for panning—allows Pat to achieve more super-sharp images per session as he moves with his subjects. "Instead of achieving, say, a couple of usable shots out of every 10, I'm now able to get at least five or six excellent images out of that group of 10," he says.

© Patrick Nagle

When he switches over to landscape photography, Pat requires a durable lens that can withstand the elements—and the 70-200 G2's moisture- and dust-resistant construction, as well as its protective fluorine coating, is a definite plus. "I can't see it, but it's definitely working hard for me," he says. "When I'm out on the beach especially, salt water can be detrimental to my equipment, so having that front-to-back protection is vital." Two exclusive new tele converters matched with the 70-200 G2 also offer Pat the extra reach he needs, which he discovered during a recent trip to Yellowstone National Park. "Being able to double my reach with it and still retain my autofocus is a huge plus," he notes.

The first trip I documented with the 70-200 G2 was to Jackson, Wyoming—and it was this midday image that really blew me away. This was at the summit of Rendezvous Mountain at Jackson Hole, at an elevation of 10,450 feet. I was taking some portraits of friends with this scene in the background when I decided to solely focus on the landscape. That's where I was really impressed, because I was zooming in at 100 percent and could make out every little line on the mountain, from where all of the skiers and snowboarders went down the slope. To be able to capture all of that detail from so many miles away was tremendous.

© Patrick Nagle

The Snake River Overlook is a favorite spot for many photographers, thanks to its view over the Snake River leading up to Grand Teton mountain. Even Ansel Adams couldn't resist the visual draw from this vantage point, taking one of his most famous black-and-white photos there. It's also a popular place to take sunrise and sunset photos. I decided to do a time lapse at sunrise, and this is one of only about 20 images where the mountain peaks were basking in that early- morning glow—the light came and went that quickly. It was beneficial to have the 70-200 G2's compression to pull just a little bit of the Snake River into the frame as well.

© Patrick Nagle

© Patrick Nagle